Moholmen Lightshouse

Vardø Lighthouse

Northbound Hurtigruten ship passing Kjeungskjær Lighthouse. Photo: Børge's Blogg

 Rick

Hurtigruten & lighthouses – companions for more than a century

Hurtigruten & lighthouses – companions for more than a century
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Today, one of the fleet of eleven ships departs daily from Bergen sailing north up around the tip of Norway and then eastwards to Kirkenes near the Russian border—and then make the return voyage. Along the way Hurtigruten calls at more than 30 ports, carrying leisure passengers, but continuing to serve ports along the way with delivering cargo as well as port-to-port passengers year round.

Northbound Hurtigruten ship passing Kjeungskjær Lighthouse. Photo: Børge’s Blogg

 

Hurtigruten (Norwegian: the fast route) coastal ships have been part of Norwegian life since the 1890s. The company arouse from the demand for safe shipping along the coastal islands and skerries between commercial centers north and south. There were comparatively few lighthouses in those days and navigation maps were not as reliable as they are today.

MS FinnmarkenToday, one of the fleet of eleven ships departs daily from Bergen sailing north up around the tip of Norway and then eastwards to Kirkenes near the Russian border – and then make the return voyage. Along the way Hurtigruten calls at more than 30 ports, carrying leisure passengers, but continuing to serve ports along the way with delivering cargo as well as port-to-port passengers year round.

A lighthouse enthusiast’s delight

Norway’s coast is very beautiful and seeing it from the sea is quite special. For the lighthouse enthusiast, there are special rewards all along the way. Norway boasts over 150 operational lighthouses. There are the classic tower structures, and there are such imagination-stretching structures as Kjeungskjær Lighthouse outside Trondheim – where you can stay if you like.

Accommodations

Norway has automated most of its still very relevant lighthouses and they are owned and cared for by the Norwegian Coastal Administration. They no longer have resident lighthouse keepers. Many lighthouses have been adopted by local municipalites (and sometimes by individuals) making overnight stays possible in the the keeper’s residences and even in the lighthouses proper. We have a list of lighthouses which offer accommodations.

Lighthouses visible from Hurtigruten

These are some of the highlights, listed from south to north.

 

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