Sigrid

The very unique Geitungen Lighthouse

Geitungen Lighthouse was the fourth lighthouse our photographer Sigrid Thorbjørnsen visited this summer and fall. The goal is to capture 12 different ones from late July to mid October.

Geitungen lighthouse is located 0.6 mile (1 km) offshore Karmøy and 2 miles (3 km) southwest of Skudeneshavn harbor. The boat trip out to the lighthouse takes about 10–20 minutes, depending on the weather. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

From the boat, on the way out, I got a glance of the lighthouse, and it looked spectacular. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Nothing is like Skudeneshavn on a sunny day. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

At first, it didn’t look like a lighthouse at all, but more like a piece of Greece in Norway. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

This feeling of Greece gets to everybody who visit the island. Mats and Eva taking it all in. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Geitungen Lighthouse owns its own boat, and the transportation is included in the stay. The hosts will come and pick you up at your convenience. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The other guests have already left when I arrived, and I could enjoy the lighthouse in all its splendor. Here, a little Greece in blue and white. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Seen from afar, the lighthouse might look small and just something quirky and white nestled on the highest point of an island. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Up-close, you see the many details and the uniqueness of the building. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Golden grass set off against blue water and sky. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Another patch of gold. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The colors of the island on a sunny day are also just overwhelming. The blue, yellow, purple, green, grey. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Everything just pops. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Every detail shows off its colors. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Harmonious colors everywhere. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Here, as at almost all of the lighthouses in Norway, you can still find leftovers from WWII. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Cast iron window frames in the ruins from WWII. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The lighthousekeeper's house is where I stayed. It has living rooms, kitchen, and bedrooms – room enough for 32 people to bunk in beds. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

A living room in the style of the 1950s. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Wood paneled bedroom. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

There is room for many. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

From the lighthouse keeper’s house, there is a winding path up to the lighthouse. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Outside, I couldn’t get enough of the whiteness and the architecture. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

New equipment in a stately old room. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The inside is like a museum mixed with a small ballroom of sorts, and add to that the feeling of being inside a church. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The halls, the floors, and the staircases, all by architect Jørgen M. Meinich, show patterns of lines and squares. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Shapes, angles, forms and patterns, light and shadows. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Details and more details. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The view from the beacon itself is breathtaking. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

Whiteness and curves makes this architecture. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The lines, the red, the blue, it all is just beautiful. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

There is beauty from every angle. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

After dinner, it was time to see if I could capture a sunset. And guess what, the lighthouse had turned pink! ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

In the reflections from the windows I saw the sun take a dive into the big blue, or should I say the big red? ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The sky flared up in yellow, orange, red, and purple. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

The ocean took the colors from the sky, the wind stopped, and nature said goodnight. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

I really do appreciate a great sunset. ©2012 Sigrid Thorbjørnsen.

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Text and photos by Sigrid Thorbjørnsen. Edited by Michael Holtermann.

The famous Norwegian painter, Edvard Munch, said it perfectly:

Nature is not only all that is visible to the eye… it also includes the inner pictures of the soul.”

Geitungen Lighthouse is something else. The lighthouse was designed by Jørgen M. Meinich who did a great job making this a very unique construction. It was first lit in 1924, and, because of the architecture, it is now protected under the Cultural Heritage Act.

Geitungen lighthouse is located 0.6 mile (1 km) offshore Karmøy and 2 miles (3 km) southwest of Skudeneshavn harbor. The boat trip out to the lighthouse takes about 10–20 minutes, depending on the weather. Nothing is like Skudeneshavn on a sunny day.

From the boat, on the way out, I got a glance of the lighthouse, and it looked spectacular. At first, it didn’t look like a lighthouse at all, but more like a piece of Greece in Norway. This feeling of Greece gets to everybody who visits the island, in more ways than one.

Geitungen Lighthouse owns its own boat, and the transportation is included in the stay. The hosts will come and pick you up at your convenience.

The other guests have already left when I arrived, and I could enjoy the lighthouse in all its splendor. A little Greece in blue and white.

Seen from afar, the lighthouse might look small and just something quirky and white nestled on the highest point of an island, but, close-up, you see the many details and the superb uniqueness of the building.

The colors of the island on a sunny day are also just overwhelming. The blue, yellow, purple, green, grey – everything just pops.

Here, as at almost all of the lighthouses in Norway, you can still find leftovers from WWII.

The lighthousekeeper’s house is where I stayed. It has living rooms, kitchen, and bedrooms – room enough for 32 people to bunk in beds.

From the lighthouse keeper’s house, there is a winding path up to the lighthouse. The inside is like a museum mixed with a ballroom of sorts, and add to that the feeling of being inside a church. The halls, the floors, and the staircases, all by architect Jørgen M. Meinich, show patterns of lines and squares, and the windows and light make this symphony of a lighthouse compete. The view from the beacon itself is breathtaking.

Outside, I couldn’t get enough of the whiteness and the architecture. The lines, the red, the blue, it all is just beautiful.

After dinner, it was time to see if I could capture a sunset. And guess what, the lighthouse had turned pink! In the reflections from the windows I saw the sun take a dive into the big blue. The sky flared up in yellow, orange, red, and purple. The ocean took the colors from the sky, the wind stopped, and nature said goodnight.

I really do appreciate a great sunset.

Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.” – Rabindranath Tagore

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