Rick

Up the mighty Geirangerfjord

Michael Holtermann and Rick Shupper sailed up the Geirangerfjord from Ålesund on Hurtigruten's Ms Finnmarken in 2005. Here are some pictures that give some impression of the beauty and awesomeness of the fjord and the charm of Geiranger village. Geirangerfjord is in Møre og Romsdal county.

Traveling on the MS Finnmarken, we passed sister ship MS Midnatsol. This picture gives a sense of how huge the fjord is–Midnatsol is a 1,000-passenger cruise liner!

Geirangerfjord is surrounded by steep mountains. There is very little habitable area on its shores. Geirangejford is 9.3 miles long and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2005. The mountains around the fjord soar up to 2,000 meters above sea level.

Here and there are little mountain farms—some of which have highly hazardous access by paths that wind around steep precipices.

The fjord is fed by many waterfalls that cascade over and down the vertical walls.

One of Geirangerfjord's famous waterfalls The Seven Sisters are located opposite another set of falls, The Suitor which is said to be wooing the sisters.

The Seven Sisters waterfalls are located in Stranda.

A view approaching a bend gives an idea of how the walls of the fjord define a narrow path. However, the fjord is deep, up to 600 and 700 meters deep.

That boat looks like a miniature toy in this context.

Cruise ships moor offshore and send passengers in smaller craft to the landing pier at the village of Geiranger.

Queen Mary II resting offshore at Geiranger.

The Queen Mary II paid a visit to Geiranger while we were there.

This being mid-summer, the foliage was extravagant and so were the streams flowing down from the surrounding mountains. The air smelled wonderful!

Heading uphill to Vesterås Fjellet to get the classic view over Geiranger, we passed this sign board.

Folks have been posing on that ledge (on the right in this photo) for as long as there have been cameras—at least. The spot is called Vesterås Fjellet.

There's no way straight up the mountain. We walked and were grateful for the moderate grade made possible by the zig-zagging road.

It's a Norwegian tradition to grow grass on the roof. It's for insulation—and the goats can go up there and graze as well.

Here's a beautiful old storage building constructed up on stilts, both to keep things dry, and to keep out small animals. The supports are under the building, away from the edge and the stairs are also not connected to the building.

Here's a contemporary home that keeps up the roof grass tradition—a very eco-friendly insulation solution.

Here's Michael up on Vesterås Fjellet, way above Geiranger. Yes, he was out on the ledge as well, but it was making me (Rick) extremely nervous.

Aged wood and simple hardware on a barn door. It's not Versailles, but the elegance is indisputable.

A warning sign next a mountain stream. Let the wanderer beware! These streams move fast and furiously.

This is not someone's carefully tended garden. These flowers are growing wild along the stream. Norway blossoms in summer!

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Michael Holtermann and Rick Shupper sailed up the Geirangerfjord from Ålesund on Hurtigruten’s Ms Finnmarken in 2005. These are a few pictures that give some impression of the beauty and awesomeness of the fjord and the charm of Geiranger village. Geirangerfjord is in Møre og Romsdal county. Photos © Rick Shupper and Michael H. Holtermann.

Learn more about Hurtigruten.

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